Daily Viral: Skydiver has epileptic seizure at 12,000 ft, saved at last second by instructor-hero

Daily Viral: Skydiver has epileptic seizure at 12,000 ft, saved at last second by instructor-hero

If Superman wore a head-cam, this is what we'd see

VicesJune 17, 2020 By Will Brendza

In case you weren’t aware: skydiving is terrifying and can have very serious consequences.

No matter how many times you’ve done it, or seen it happen, throwing one’s self out of a plane thousands of feet in the air is always freaky and never safe. And it’s even riskier when you do it with a pre-existing condition like epilepsy.

Which was exactly the case for 22-year-old Christopher Jones of Australia, who recently had a shit-your-pants skydiving accident that could have ended very, very badly.

“I've always wanted to have the feeling of flight, so I just thought, considering I can't fly a plane due to my condition, I thought I'd give it a go," said Jones.

So, he signed himself up for a skydiving session. But only a few seconds after he threw himself out of the plane and into the ether, Jones started to convulse, his vision tunneled and he passed out. He was plummeting, unconscious towards the Earth and his body turned over, belly up, in a full-blown epileptic seizure.

Watching the nightmare unfold, his skydiving instructor, Sheldon McFarlane, made a daring dive towards Jones. Like superman, the diving instructor caught up with his student somewhere around 4,000 feet, barley managing to get his hand on the rip cord and pulling it just in the nick of time.

Jones’ parachute exploded open and he drifted safely and uneventfully back down to Earth.

It was a daring and totally badass rescue, all caught on McFarlane’s helmet cam. McFarlane said, after the rescue that he knew Jones’ automatic parachute would open up eventually — but figured it was better to get the chute open sooner rather than later.

McFarlane calls the moment one of the scariest of his life, and, watching the video, I’m sure it was. Someone should get this man a medal.