Hardcore legislation set to hit Great Britain. Internet service providers forced to block porn, unless you ask the government to receive it.

Hardcore legislation set to hit Great Britain. Internet service providers forced to block porn, unless you ask the government to receive it.

SexJuly 22, 2013

Since when is pornography still an issue? We thought freedom-loving countries had pretty much agreed on this whole freedom of speech and expression thing. Porn lovers in Great Britain will now be forced to tuck their penises and vaginas between their legs and ask permission to watch porn. Really, good job Great Britain. Now go back to fixing something important like your shitty teeth or winning the Revolutionary War.  

Via BBC: Today, he announced he had reached agreement with the four biggest ISPs on pornography filters, after some behind the scenes tussling. But he hinted that if search engines like Google didn't agree to a blacklist of search terms, he would legislate.

From Downing St, he can supplement the art of persuasion with the smack of firm government. Back in his opposition days, Cameron made waves presenting himself as a man on the side of parents against firms that sold chocolates at checkouts and children's bikinis. If he can mould a similar image in Downing St, as a PM doing battle with big business on behalf of fellow parents, he will be more than happy. Mr Cameron also called for some "horrific" internet search terms to be "blacklisted", meaning they would automatically bring up no results on websites such as Google or Bing.

He told the BBC he expected a "row" with service providers who, he said in his speech, were "not doing enough to take responsibility" despite having a "moral duty" to do so. He also warned he could have to "force action" by changing the law and that, if there were "technical obstacles", firms should use their "greatest brains" to overcome them. In his speech, Mr Cameron said family-friendly filters would be automatically selected for all new customers by the end of the year - although they could choose to switch them off. And millions of existing computer users would be contacted by their internet providers and told they must decide whether to use or not use "family-friendly filters" to restrict adult material. The filters would apply to all devices linked to the affected home Wi-Fi network and across the public Wi-Fi network "wherever children are likely to be present".