Immaculate conception is still not a thing despite pregnant nun's attempt to convince us otherwise

Immaculate conception is still not a thing despite pregnant nun's attempt to convince us otherwise

SexJanuary 20, 2014

A Salvadorean nun magically gave birth last weekend in Italy after she felt stomach cramps in her convent and was rushed to the hospital for medical attention. But her cramps turned out to be none other than a seven-pound baby boy.

Saying that she "did not know she was pregnant," she claimed she had respected her vow to celibacy and wasn't quite sure how she ended up with a fertilized egg that grew into a human. 

Immaculate conception is one theory, but we asked science, and science was like, "...seriously? Yeah, no that's not a thing."

"It's not possible, I'm a nun," she told doctors. But her fellow nuns weren't even buying it. "It appears she was not able to resist temptation," said the convent's mother superior, solidifying that you're no longer allowed to use immaculate conception as an excuse for missing school, not going out with friends, or canceling on a date. It's officially not a thing.

Resisting the overwhelming urge to name the baby Jesus, she called it "Francesco" after Pope Francis.

Last year, the British Medical Journal published a study that found almost 1 percent of young women in the U.S. claimed they got pregnant despite never having sex nor using assisted reproductive technologies.  Of the 5,340 women who reported pregnancy, 45—or 0.8 percent—reported a virgin pregnancy. Don't forget to stay in school!