Artist Palehorse proves following your bliss can only open doors of opportunity

Artist Palehorse proves following your bliss can only open doors of opportunity

CultureNovember 17, 2018

When it comes to illustrations, Palehorse sits in a league with an esteemed few. We talking with the Florida artist about illustrations, Netflix and the commodotization of the art world. 

A/S/L?
39/Male/St. Petersburg, Fla.

What's your preferred medium to work with?
I create my illustrations using a Wacom Cintiq graphics tablet and Adobe Photoshop. From there, I have the artwork printed, laser etched, or silkscreened directly onto various substrates, such as layered wood, acrylic glass, metallic panels, foil posters and skateboard installations.



In your eyes, how has social media changed the art world?
One big effect from social media that I’ve noticed, is that fans these days are not only interested in the images that artists create, but they also want to intimately know the artist behind the curtain. People have become interested the process and not just the end product. It’s forcing introverted artists like myself to break out of the comfort of the studio to find avenues to connect and share with others in ways that we likely wouldn’t have done otherwise.

If you had to pick one song to listen to for the rest of your life, what would it be?
‘Dopesmoker’ by the band Sleep.

When art gets commodified, does it hurt the craft or better it?
The more art and opportunities for artists to work and earn a good living the better. I think we are in somewhat of a golden age of art here on planet Earth and I am thoroughly enjoying all of the incredible eye candy that so many creative individuals, as well as companies are producing.



What's your favorite piece of art you've done?
I’m most satisfied with my latest diptych that was created for a recent group exhibit curated by Cass Contemporary Gallery. In addition to the larger gallery pieces, I also adapted the artwork as screen-printed gig posters for Foo Fighters and Queens of the Stone Age.


How long do you think you spend on one piece (on average)?
I balance my gallery and personal illustrations with an array of client projects which are much more demanding and generally require long days/nights and fast turn-arounds to meet deadlines. In this case, a detailed illustration will usually take around 4-7 days to complete.

What shows are you binging on right now?
I’m more of an audiobook guy than a television fan, but a series that I really enjoyed recently was American Gods based on the novel by Neil Gaiman.



If someone's broke but still wants to create, what's the best way to start?
I think most artists generally start creating when broke and by using whatever means are and materials available to them. The key is to never give up searching for your life’s purpose and true potential. Though we are all connected, we are all totally unique beings with our own, personal visions and stories to tell. The most important element to creating something meaningful is inspiration.

Best advice you've ever gotten (and followed)?
I really like what Joseph Campbell says, because I’ve found this to be true so many times in my career, that I now trust it as divine truth. He says: ‘Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.’



Shameless plug(s): I’m releasing this 5-color screen-print with www.collectionzz.com that I think came out really stunning. A main edition, as well as gold and red, mirror foil variants will be available. The artwork is my homage to Black Sabbath and is inspired by the song ‘War Pigs’. A percentage of the proceeds of this print will be going directly to The Living/Dying Project, a non-profit organization offering conscious and compassionate support in the spirit of mutual exploration to those facing life-threatening illness, to their caregivers, to those facing life’s most difficult situations, and to anyone committed to spiritual transformation.
Site: PalehorseDesign.com

IG, Twitter & Facebook: @palehorsedesign