Science proves it: threesomes really are on the rise

Science proves it: threesomes really are on the rise

SexJuly 08, 2019 By Eleanor Gray

"Ezra" is attractive and adventurous, and she wants to be a unicorn. 

Not a mythical horse with magic powers. 

Ezra, 26, wants to gallop into other couples' beds, to complete the mythical threesome. 

That role is called a unicorn because many people don't believe they exist. Because while there are threesomes all over the Internet, the Hulk is all over the Internet, too. 

But Ezra is real; she's been cruising the gender-fluid bars, challenging open-looking couples to skeeball games. She's scrolled through Feeld, which is Tinder for threesomes, and gotten plenty of responses. 

She's not alone. 

Science suggests threesomes aren't just confined to your Internet algorithm. Real-life threesomes are on the rise. 

What a time to be alive. 

In a recent study published in PLoS One, about 2,000 adults revealed that, while threesomes aren't clogging the streets and causing traffic jams, threesomes aren't unusual. 

One in seven Americans has had a threesome in their lifetimes.

Is that a lot? For comparison, one in seven Americans will go to a Super Bowl party, and one in seven are television "cord cutters." 

In other words: not most people, but lots of people.

Way more than at any time in human history. 

It's different by gender: one in five men, and one in 10 women have had a threesome. If those numbers don't match, they don't have to: there are lots of dudes having MMF threesomes with some very, very special ladies. 

(Curiosity is greater than execution: 82 percent of men and 31 percent of women are interested in a saucy triumvirate, according to a study in the journal Sexualities, Evolution and Gender. What's holding these folks back? Shame, lack of opportunity, residual stigma against queerness.) 

And what's behind the rise in threesomes? Experts point to porn, where threesomes rise to the top of the algorithms, and women are actually more likely to search for "threesome" than men, according to PornHub. And to the loosening grip of Abrahamic faiths like Christianity and Judaism, which preach monogamy and straightness. 

Whatever the cultural factors, the people — the actual humans — causing the rise in threesomes are women: mostly post-college females — people like Ezra. 

Women in their late twenties are driving the trend in threesomes, as 18 percent have triangled. Six percent had one in the last year. Those are higher numbers than men in the same age bracket. 

On the other hand, almost no super-old ladies have three-wayed, according to the study. (Although Martha Stewart, 77, says "maybe." [And one in ten men over 70 have had threesomes, which — good for you, grandpa.]) 

Why are younger women interested? Everyone has their reasons. For Ezra, who is mostly lesbian, "I'm exploring my sexuality … and attracted to the prospect of being intimate with a man without it having to be one-on-one."

For now, Ezra is going to keep cruising the queer-ish bars, maybe letting word drop that she's a unicorn. And if it happens, it happen. 

"I want it to happen organically," Ezra says. "I met a really hot couple at [a bar] last night." They made her smile — and maybe neigh a little bit.

[Cover photo: Three attractive people. From Shutterstock.]