The shady practice of rigging claw games has finally come to an end

The shady practice of rigging claw games has finally come to an end

CultureMay 11, 2017 By Brian Frederick

You hate your parents right now. Why? Because they never gave up one measly dollar to let you play the stupid claw game. "It's rigged," they'd say. "No one ever wins at those things."

And damn it if they weren't right. They're impossible. Though according to a recently dropped press release by The American Amusement Machine Association (AAMA), the impossible is now closer to being possible.

In an effort to win back trust from its consumers, the association has put forth a "Fair Play Pledge" — meaning the shady practice of rigging machines with prizes in them is over. 

The AAMA is a non-profit lobbying group that represents everyone from Bandai Namco and Sega to full on fun-filled destinations such as Dave & Busters and Cinemark theaters. In the release, it pushes the idea that moving forward, all manufacturers registered with the AAMA have to "meet a standard of performance that allows a player a fair chance of winning with every game played."

It's now up to skill and perseverance and not just through the emotions of some janky claw that seems broken but actually isn't. 

More specifically, the release states:

1. An opportunity exists that allows for players to win by the application of skill such that the player will have sufficient time to identify, recognize and react with every game play.
2. A player can improve with practice and experience.
3. The player’s input controls the outcome of the game.

Speaking to The Sun, a representative of AAMA claimed it wants “to emphasise that we are not in the business of rigging our games.”

"That’s not to say it’s going to be easy," Pete Gustafson, Executive Vice President of the AAMA, adds. "But with correct application of skill, they can win every time ... there's no situation where the software will manipulate the outcome such that the player can't win."

Fire under the ass of manufacturers were finally lit because of things like a 2013 lawsuit that claimed Sega's 'Keyhole' game was unfair and didn't provide prizes when a player actually won. This of course is true, however the lawsuit was eventually thrown out on two separate occasions because the judge was confused by the wording of it, the lawyers wanted too much money, and those who did sue didn't do it the right way. 

So the next time you see mom and dad, give them a hug and say they were right all along. That's the least you can do for being such a bratty kid with no appreciation for the value of a dollar.